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January 6, 2010 / Toby Dayton

Google On The Road To Looking Like Yahoo

First the Chrome ads popped onto Google’s homepage, and then, as expected, the Nexus One ad appeared shortly thereafter.

So much for the clean homepage that was such a part of Google’s identity.

My initial assumption is that the new clutter on the Google homepage shows just how formidable an opponent the search giant perceives Apple to be. With Chrome v. Safari and iPhone v. Nexus One, Google is willing to retreat from the sacrosanctity of its homepage in an effort to win market share. Never once in the dozens of battles with Microsoft, did Google ever feel compelled to jeopardize its homepage. Based on that fact alone, I’d chalk up round one for Apple in what is surely to become the largest corporate behemoth battle of the decade.

Nexus One on Google Homepage

5 Comments

  1. StevenRothberg / Jan 6 2010 6:13 pm

    Is it really an ad when you're simply promoting your own services to your own users? It isn't like Google is running ads for other organizations on its home page.

  2. Anonymous / Jan 7 2010 12:13 am

    Is it really an ad when you’re simply promoting your own services to your own users? It isn’t like Google is running ads for other organizations on its home page.

  3. Toby Dayton / Jan 7 2010 11:47 am

    It's an ad.

    Interestingly enough, here's a story that ran today in MediaPost:

    Google Runs Multimillion-Dollar Ad For Nexus One
    by Laurie Sullivan, Yesterday, 6:45 PM

    Google began running a one-line blurb on google.com Wednesday to promote the Nexus One mobile phone that the Mountain View, Calif. search engine unveiled the day before. The link goes directly to the Web site set up to sell the phone.

    Gene Munster, research analyst at Piper Jaffray, pegs the value of the home page takeover at between $15 and $20 CPMs, or $4 million to $5 million for a buyout per day. It's not the first time Google has run a one-line tag on google.com to promote products. Munster says they did it for the Motorola Droid phone and the Chrome Browser.

    In November, Google's home page in the United States had 147.7 million unique visitors and 452.6 million average daily page views, according to comScore Media Metrix.

    Google, which takes pride in keeping the home page uncluttered and clean, ran a Droid ad for about 18 hours when the phone launched in November, estimates Trip Chowdhry, managing director at Global Equities Research. He calls the ad “priceless, worth about a trillion dollars,” because no one else has the “privilege” of running an ad on that page.

    Has Google changed its stance on using the home page as a promotional platform? Adam Hartung, an analyst with Spark Partners, refers to Google's home page as a “sacred cow.” The company has something that almost seems like a religious idol. This ad demonstrates that Google is willing to change that and “attack a sacred cow to step the company forward,” he says. “And that's a very good sign for investors.”

    If successful, Google always has the option of moving the one-line ad to YouTube, according to Aaron Kessler, senior research analyst at Kaufman Bros., San Francisco, Calif. “Google is obviously putting all their weight behind mobile, which is one of their top three initiatives,” he says. “They have had failures in other areas, but they are dedicated to making sure mobile thrives. Radio and TV advertising didn't turn out too well for them.”

  4. Toby Dayton / Jan 7 2010 5:47 pm

    It’s an ad.

    Interestingly enough, here’s a story that ran today in MediaPost:

    Google Runs Multimillion-Dollar Ad For Nexus One
    by Laurie Sullivan, Yesterday, 6:45 PM

    Google began running a one-line blurb on google.com Wednesday to promote the Nexus One mobile phone that the Mountain View, Calif. search engine unveiled the day before. The link goes directly to the Web site set up to sell the phone.

    Gene Munster, research analyst at Piper Jaffray, pegs the value of the home page takeover at between $15 and $20 CPMs, or $4 million to $5 million for a buyout per day. It’s not the first time Google has run a one-line tag on google.com to promote products. Munster says they did it for the Motorola Droid phone and the Chrome Browser.

    In November, Google’s home page in the United States had 147.7 million unique visitors and 452.6 million average daily page views, according to comScore Media Metrix.

    Google, which takes pride in keeping the home page uncluttered and clean, ran a Droid ad for about 18 hours when the phone launched in November, estimates Trip Chowdhry, managing director at Global Equities Research. He calls the ad “priceless, worth about a trillion dollars,” because no one else has the “privilege” of running an ad on that page.

    Has Google changed its stance on using the home page as a promotional platform? Adam Hartung, an analyst with Spark Partners, refers to Google’s home page as a “sacred cow.” The company has something that almost seems like a religious idol. This ad demonstrates that Google is willing to change that and “attack a sacred cow to step the company forward,” he says. “And that’s a very good sign for investors.”

    If successful, Google always has the option of moving the one-line ad to YouTube, according to Aaron Kessler, senior research analyst at Kaufman Bros., San Francisco, Calif. “Google is obviously putting all their weight behind mobile, which is one of their top three initiatives,” he says. “They have had failures in other areas, but they are dedicated to making sure mobile thrives. Radio and TV advertising didn’t turn out too well for them.”

  5. Toby Dayton / Jan 7 2010 5:47 pm

    It's an ad.

    Interestingly enough, here's a story that ran today in MediaPost:

    Google Runs Multimillion-Dollar Ad For Nexus One
    by Laurie Sullivan, Yesterday, 6:45 PM

    Google began running a one-line blurb on google.com Wednesday to promote the Nexus One mobile phone that the Mountain View, Calif. search engine unveiled the day before. The link goes directly to the Web site set up to sell the phone.

    Gene Munster, research analyst at Piper Jaffray, pegs the value of the home page takeover at between $15 and $20 CPMs, or $4 million to $5 million for a buyout per day. It's not the first time Google has run a one-line tag on google.com to promote products. Munster says they did it for the Motorola Droid phone and the Chrome Browser.

    In November, Google's home page in the United States had 147.7 million unique visitors and 452.6 million average daily page views, according to comScore Media Metrix.

    Google, which takes pride in keeping the home page uncluttered and clean, ran a Droid ad for about 18 hours when the phone launched in November, estimates Trip Chowdhry, managing director at Global Equities Research. He calls the ad “priceless, worth about a trillion dollars,” because no one else has the “privilege” of running an ad on that page.

    Has Google changed its stance on using the home page as a promotional platform? Adam Hartung, an analyst with Spark Partners, refers to Google's home page as a “sacred cow.” The company has something that almost seems like a religious idol. This ad demonstrates that Google is willing to change that and “attack a sacred cow to step the company forward,” he says. “And that's a very good sign for investors.”

    If successful, Google always has the option of moving the one-line ad to YouTube, according to Aaron Kessler, senior research analyst at Kaufman Bros., San Francisco, Calif. “Google is obviously putting all their weight behind mobile, which is one of their top three initiatives,” he says. “They have had failures in other areas, but they are dedicated to making sure mobile thrives. Radio and TV advertising didn't turn out too well for them.”

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